Home » Chronic supplementary dl-alpha tocopheryl acetate stimulates brain accelerated aging: S100B, RAGE and microglia. by Lynn Ann McGoey
Chronic supplementary dl-alpha tocopheryl acetate stimulates brain accelerated aging: S100B, RAGE and microglia. Lynn Ann McGoey

Chronic supplementary dl-alpha tocopheryl acetate stimulates brain accelerated aging: S100B, RAGE and microglia.

Lynn Ann McGoey

Published
ISBN : 9780549941248
NOOKstudy eTextbook
104 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

S100B is a calcium-binding protein largely produced and released by astroglial cells of the brain to have both neurotoxic and neurotrophic effects. The gene for S100B is found on chromosome 21, and thus the protein is thought to be involved in theMoreS100B is a calcium-binding protein largely produced and released by astroglial cells of the brain to have both neurotoxic and neurotrophic effects. The gene for S100B is found on chromosome 21, and thus the protein is thought to be involved in the neuropathology of Down Syndrome (DS) as well as Alzheimers disease (AD) given that most DS individuals develop AD at an early age. Levels of S100B are particularly high during development and aging, and heightened levels have been associated with neuroinflammatory induced neuronal damage such as that seen with microglial activation and upregulation of the S100B receptor, RAGE (receptor for advanced glycation endproducts). This study examined the effects of heightened levels of S100B on microglial activation, RAGE immunoreactivity and neuronal damage in the hippocampus of S100B-overexpressing transgenic mice as compared to CD1 controls at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months of age. The dietary effect of the antioxidant dl-alpha tocopheryl acetate (Vitamin E) was also assessed. Results show that S100B overexpression increases microglial reactivity, RAGE upregulation and neuronal loss as the S100B-overexpressing animals age. Within these mice, Vitamin E significantly increased microglial activation and RAGE reactivity at 5.5 and 10 months of age with significant neuronal loss seen by 10 months of age.